5 Things You Can Do to Get Over Your Alcohol Addiction

alcohol panther

Alcohol addiction is a frustrating condition to deal with. A study published in the JAMA Network Open shows that one in five Americans between the ages of 20 and 49 die from overconsumption of alcohol. It’s difficult to know if you have a problem and even more difficult to stop drinking once you realize that you do. However, there are ways to overcome your alcohol addiction. 

In this post, we’ll discuss some of the best ways to overcome alcohol addiction.

#1 Seek Help

Seeking help is an important part of the recovery process, and there are many different types of help you can find. It’s best if you can get help from professionals like therapists or doctors. You can also seek out assistance from family members and friends who will be able to provide you with support when needed. 

You may also want to seek out an addiction specialist for additional counseling services if necessary. Alternatively, seeking out the help of a support group or church leader can be beneficial as well because both offer guidance through difficult circumstances like addiction issues.

Epiphany Wellness, a drug rehab center based in New Jersey, does a wonderful job in this regard. Their success rate tells it all, and it’s their approach to helping people get back up from alcohol addiction that makes the whole process seem so easy. Of course, it’s not easy, but with the people and resources they and many other rehabs have, it’s a sign that things are bound to go well if you pick the right place and don’t give up on yourself. 

According to The U.S. Addiction Rehab Industry – 5th Edition, as of 2020, the U.S. addiction rehab industry is valued at $42 billion. With time, its value will only grow. That means you can expect these facilities to keep working on developing their infrastructure to provide better treatment to those who avail of their services. 

#2 Do Not Skip Counseling

If you’re thinking about quitting drinking, there is no better time than the present. If you need some help doing that, consider counseling. 

Counseling can help you to understand the root of your addiction and identify what triggers it. It also teaches coping skills that prevent you from turning to alcohol when times get tough.

Counseling can be especially helpful if you have other mental health issues as well, like anxiety or depression. 

#3 Learn to Identify Your Triggers and Avoid Them

Identify your triggers and avoid them. If you know you get angry or depressed after a glass of wine, don’t have any in the house, and don’t have people over who drink it. If you know that beer and nachos are your downfalls, don’t go to the bar where they’re served.

Find other ways to cope with stress, boredom, and loneliness that don’t involve alcohol, like going for walks, drawing, meditating, etc. Don’t beat yourself up if you slip up along the way. 

Remember that alcohol addiction is difficult to overcome. That doesn’t mean you should give up. It means taking comfort in knowing that everyone slips up occasionally. Then start fresh tomorrow morning with some new strategies for staying sober today instead of beating yourself up over yesterday’s mistakes.

#4 Find a Hobby That You Enjoy

It is important to find hobbies that you enjoy, and that will help you grow as a person. You can look into joining a support group or taking classes at the local community center to help further your interests.

Beer and alcohol
Beer and alcohol

You may not know what you want to do in your free time, but it’s important to try out new things and see where they take you.

Hobbies are an excellent way of finding something engaging enough for us to forget about our problems for a little while but not so distracting that we lose focus on our goals for sobriety.

#5 Avoid Alcohol-Centric Places

To avoid your triggers, it’s important to avoid the places where you usually drink. This can be difficult if you work in a bar or restaurant or frequently socialize with people who drink heavily.

To prevent yourself from slipping back into old habits, try setting aside time when you know there won’t be alcohol around. For example, try going for a walk in the park during lunch instead of grabbing drinks after work with your co-workers. Try setting aside nights at home instead of going out with friends on Saturdays or Sundays. 

It might seem counterintuitive at first because socializing is part of what makes living enjoyable. However, avoiding alcohol-centric places can help keep your mind clear and focused on your recovery goals so that staying sober becomes second nature for you over time. 

Alcohol dependence is a serious issue. According to CDC data, deaths due to alcohol use increased in 2020, and the situation is likely to grow worse. Thus, it’s important to take steps to get over it as soon as possible. The aforementioned steps can help you get through this problem. It might take time, but it will surely do the job.